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Time-honored Key Workouts – Part 2

We live in the age of acceleration: new technologies and methods of training and coaching are emerging almost daily. Keeping up with all this new information keeps us all on our toes, but some key workouts have stood the test of time. Here are seven examples and why to include them in your yearly training.

Run

Tempo Runs

Tempo runs are critical to running faster and stronger especially off the bike. They teach your mind and your muscles to reach a new level of confidence and performance. Your body learns how to buffer lactic acid and your mind learns how to keep pushing when it hurts. During one of my conversations with Alicia Kaye, I asked her what was her one key, go to run workout that helped her prep for racing. For her, it was the 20-minute tempo run.

As a coach, I assign various distance or time based tempo runs and tempo intervals to all of my athletes at all levels of ability throughout the season. Intensity for these sessions can determined using pace, heart rate or rating of perceived exertion (RPE). There are many definitions of how to do a tempo workout, much will depend on your level of experience and run fitness. For novice triathletes, the best place to start is at an RPE of 6 on a scale from 0-10. The intervals should feel hard but doable, challenging but at an effort you could sustain for longer intervals.

Long Runs

Long runs help you run stronger, longer and hold your speed in a race. When I first started racing, I always fell apart at about mile 4 of a 10k. After doing my long runs regularly, I ran strong for the whole 10k. The long run can be done many ways, but the most important concept is to make it a relaxed, easy aerobic effort. Just putting in the time or miles consistently.

Running your long run too fast can excessively fatigue your body and hinders your recovery and performance in your quality workouts. Back in my day, Colleen Cannon, one of the fastest triathlon runners of her day, felt so embarrassed by how slow she had to run her long run, that she ran in the dark so no one would see her! More recently, many of the fastest ITU runners follow a run/walk pattern for their long runs. This way, you recover faster, feel better and can run more volume with decreased risk of injury.

Run/walks are not just for first timers!

Brick

Run off the bike

Brick workouts are what make our sport so unique. Who doesn’t remember their first run off the bike? Running off the bike can be done throughout the season and throughout your race career. They can be short, long and at various speeds depending on the time of year. It’s also a great way to practice your T2 skills.

Runs off the bike need to be frequent enough that it feels easier and easier to hit the run at race pace as soon as possible, but not so frequent that it compromises your recovery and quality run workouts. Athletes coming into triathlon from a strong running background may feel running is more challenging for a while. Remember, it’s just a skill and a mental hurdle that improves with time and consistent training. The more you do them, the easier they feel and the faster you can run. You know you’re making progress when that stiff, heavy leg feeling disappears sooner and sooner.

To train and race at your best, incorporate these time honored and athlete tested workouts as part of your training regime throughout the race year.

Contact Coach Mantak

Time-honored Key Workouts – Part 1

  We live in the age of acceleration: new technologies and methods of training and coaching are emerging almost daily. Keeping up with all this new information keeps us all on our toes, but some key workouts have stood the test of time. Here are seven examples and why to include them in your yearly […]

Technique for Intermediate Swimmers – Part 2

Bilateral breathing.   At the intermediate level, breathing effectively on both sides is an essential skill. Bilateral breathing means alternating breathing pattern from the left to right every third, fifth, seventh stroke. Bilateral breathing gives your stroke symmetry and balance and helps with navigation in open water. But, any pattern of breathing to both sides works […]

Technique for Intermediate Swimmers – Part 1

One of the great challenges of the sport of triathlon is balancing experience, expertise and fitness across three individual sports, then combining them into a single, three sport event. The swim can cause anxiety even for the seasoned triathlete. Keep working on your weaknesses; turn them into strengths to grow your fitness, competence and confidence. […]

How to Practice Open Water Swimming in the Pool

For the majority of triathlons, you’ll be swimming in open water. This is typically a source of anxiety and fear for many athletes as training for the open water is often limited. While not perfect, it is possible to do some of your preparations for race day in a pool! Here are some drills and […]

Find a wetsuit that suits you – pt. 2

As a coach, I’m often asked questions about wetsuits. In the early days of triathlon, a wetsuit truly was an optional piece of equipment. More and more, it is becoming a required piece of equipment. To the most basic questions: Do I really need a wetsuit? Will a wetsuit make me faster? I respond: it […]

Find a wetsuit that suits you

As a coach, I’m often asked questions about wetsuits. In the early days of triathlon, a wetsuit truly was an optional piece of equipment. More and more, it is becoming a required piece of equipment. To the most basic questions: Do I really need a wetsuit? Will a wetsuit make me faster? I respond: it […]

How to prevent Illness from derailing your training

As the weather turns colder, cold and flu bugs are lurking around every corner giving our immune systems have a hefty job to keep us healthy. As endurance athletes, we’re all healthier on one hand, but also more vulnerable to upper respiratory illness such as colds and flus. Here are some tips on how to […]

Maximize your off season, part 2

Fall is upon us. The days are shorter and nights are cooler. I really love this time of year. In Colorado, the air is crisp and clear. Autumn can be short here 90 degrees one day, snow the next and we’re on to winter! Off-season training: what does it mean? What’s the best use of […]

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