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Sleep: Why Roger Federer Gets 12 hours of sleep a day

Maybe it’s a dream to be a professional athlete and sleep 12 hours a day, yet this brief interview with neuroscientist Matthew Walker offers critical information to anyone who trains for triathlon. Click here to see the entire interview!

As Dr. Walker points out, “Sleep is the greatest legal performance enhancing drug that few athletes are abusing enough.” He goes on to state that Roger Federer, Usain Bolt and LeBron James regularly get 12 hours of sleep a day, 10 hours of sleep at night and 2 hours of naps during the day. Again, maybe it’s a dream to get even close to this much sleep a day, but could we all benefit from more sleep? The answer is a huge yes. Here are the research-based benefits that getting adequate (8 hours or more) sleep on a regular basis will have on your physical performance in training and racing:

  1. Getting more sleep the night before your race will improve your performance that day.
  2. Getting adequate sleep on a regular basis repairs and regenerates tissues after hard training and prepares the body to perform.
  3. Regular training creates a low level chronic inflammatory response. Sleep decreases this accumulated inflammation in the body.
  4. Speed of muscle tissue repair and regeneration increases with adequate sleep.
  5. Recovering from day to day training and life stresses is dramatically improved when getting adequate sleep.
  6. When you start to short change your sleep, 6 hours or less, time to physical exhaustion is dropped by 40%. This means that fatigue during a workout or race will happen sooner…. Approximately 60% into your event.
  7. Peak muscle strength decreases with inadequate sleep.
  8. Less sleep decreases lung power and respiration, making it harder to take in oxygen and exhale CO2.
  9. Even the body’s ability to perspire and cool itself is diminished with inadequate.
  10. Injury risk increases exponentially with decreased sleep. The less sleep you get the greater your risk of injury: 6 hours or less, means up to 80% chance of getting injured, 9 hours = 15-20% injury risk.

Sleep truly is the best, least expensive, legal, performance-enhancing drug there is.

Click here to learn more about these statistics from Dr. Matthew Walker.

Contact Coach Mantak

The Climate Factor: impact on triathlon training and racing

Weather is nothing new for triathletes. Weather happens and it’s unpredictable. We take what we get, even revel in the added challenge. With all the talk of climate change, what exactly is climate change? And what impact is it already having on triathlon training and racing? You can take positive steps to ride the climate […]

Race day warm-up: does it really make a difference?

My initial response to this question is YES. But, that’s the simple answer. The more complicated answer is: it depends. Read on for 8 tips on how to understand which factors matter for you, how to get more out of your warm up, improve race results and learn sample warm up strategies for your next […]

Testing and Assessment in the Off-Season:

Analyze and Implement New Skills Now for Exceptional Results in 2019   It’s December, officially the off-season for most triathletes. The first goal is to recover and rejuvenate from the many months of accumulated stresses caused by training and racing. The off-season provides many opportunities to learn and prepare for the coming season. Now’s the […]

Cold and flu season has arrived. When you’re feeling under the weather, is it best to train or not to train? What does the research say? Scientists have been looking at this issue for many years and some good information has come from their research. In one study of mice, one group ran to exhaustion […]

Time-honored Key Workouts – Part 2

We live in the age of acceleration: new technologies and methods of training and coaching are emerging almost daily. Keeping up with all this new information keeps us all on our toes, but some key workouts have stood the test of time. Here are seven examples and why to include them in your yearly training. […]

Time-honored Key Workouts – Part 1

  We live in the age of acceleration: new technologies and methods of training and coaching are emerging almost daily. Keeping up with all this new information keeps us all on our toes, but some key workouts have stood the test of time. Here are seven examples and why to include them in your yearly […]

Technique for Intermediate Swimmers – Part 2

Bilateral breathing.   At the intermediate level, breathing effectively on both sides is an essential skill. Bilateral breathing means alternating breathing pattern from the left to right every third, fifth, seventh stroke. Bilateral breathing gives your stroke symmetry and balance and helps with navigation in open water. But, any pattern of breathing to both sides works […]

Technique for Intermediate Swimmers – Part 1

One of the great challenges of the sport of triathlon is balancing experience, expertise and fitness across three individual sports, then combining them into a single, three sport event. The swim can cause anxiety even for the seasoned triathlete. Keep working on your weaknesses; turn them into strengths to grow your fitness, competence and confidence. […]

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